Hmmm. If you haven’t the time to make bags, fill the centre of a pretty handkerchief with the dried flowers, pull up the four corners and knot them. Click at right to share your own photo in this page. Thanks for the great information. It is also medicinal, containing salicylic acid (the stuff aspirin is made of) and therefore said to be good for headaches. Thanks! It is best to use the fresh leaves whenever possible, because it loses some medicinal benefits when the leaves are dried. I got feverfew seedlings from a friend last year and forgot what they were as they spent the first year growing beautiful lacy nice to me smelling foliage. Maybe I missed it in your information. **When using Feverfew as a medicinal herb, you use the leaves, either fresh or dried, for your herbal tea, tinctures, salves, etc. I found this interesting article on feverfew http://articles.grandmasherbs.com/articles/Medicinal-Herbs/FEVERFEW-55.html. One of the best ways to use Feverfew for joints and muscles is in a homemade herbal salve in combination with other inflammation herbs. I'll try Wild Damson Gin in september. It often does a second blooming for me. **Make sure you give your Feverfew plant good soil with great drainage and regular watering. Plans will self-sow and flowers should be removed as needed to focus energy on leaf production. So, how did I do? **Feverfew can also be propagated by cuttings and by root division. Thank you for the kind words! Plant 4 to 6 inches long root divisions at the same depth they were growing. Here is a list of medicinal uses of Feverfew: Feverfew is an excellent and famous remedy for migraines and headaches. It is also medicinal, containing salicylic acid (the stuff aspirin is made of) and therefore said to be good for headaches. We had a bad infestation of clothes moths and had to get the carpets & furniture sprayed they are coming back though after 3 years clear of them. If you do have larvae, consider deep freezing, dry cleaning or steam cleaning. cut fresh leaves for use as needed or dry and store in an airtight container. Another option is to grow this plant from root divisions or cuttings. I will be harvesting it and making the recipes you describe. The seeds need light to germinate, so sow them on the surface or under a very light layer of soil that sunlight can penetrate. **If you are still not interested in growing feverfew, but you are interested in the medicinal benefits, you could always buy dried Feverfew or a Feverfew extract from a good-quality company like Mountain Rose Herbs. I fell in love with these little gems two years ago, grew again last year, and have sowed almost 500 this year. I just bought a feverfew plant and am excited to start my herb garden as soon as weather allows me to dig out a bed! headache tonic; relief from insect bites; calms nerves; soothes coughs and aids in breathing. Not that I am sure I would take it because the salicylic acid makes it taste exceedingly bitter. The flowers are a good remedy for treating headaches but when I was researching potpourri I discovered they are an extremely good moth repellent. Let a few seed heads remain in the garden in early fall and you may get new seedlings the following spring. Fewerfew loves my garden. skin care, moth repellant, and plantings for walkways, edgings, beds and borders. It would be worth drying and saving these to make into little sweet smelling anti moth bags for Christmas gifts. Hi, the homesteadgarden! Please feel free to comment in the comment section below about your herb garden. **Feverfew can also be propagated by cuttings and by root division. Thanks for the recipe. If that’s great, great, but if that’s not great then plant it somewhere away from flowers or trees needing pollination. Reply. Luckily we don’t have moths so I make tinctures with them for the headache cure. I’ve just made this chutney and it’s delicious, the citrus ingredients work really well and overall there’s a great depth of flavour with a taste of s…, I have a Rosa lutea, it must be 20 years old now, covering a pergola & taking over a Magnolia nearby. Not that I am sure I would take it because the salicylic acid makes it taste exceedingly bitter. I came here from the Starving Off the Land and am pleased to find this post. Feverfew already helps me with migraines, and I would just love to see what it can do for my dry, itchy skin! When I had chronic migraines, I took drops of tincture everyday until I had reduced symptoms. The seeds that I have, have been indoors since I dried them with the leaves and stems last fall; it’s just now that I realize that they weren’t cold-stratified this winter, so of course, I m wondering if I should just plant them in the fall for next spring’s crop… what can you tell me about this, please? Hate clothes moths. Not only do I grow Feverfew for medicinal purposes, it is a stunningly beautiful perennial with little white daisy-type flowers and lovely green leaves. Thanks for taking some time to share your knowledge. Share on ThriftyFunThis page contains the following solutions. Your email address will not be published. It is believed that if you eat some Feverfew leaves everyday, you can reduce your chance of getting migraines. **You can propagate Feverfew by seed quite easily. I used to keep just a few plants dotted around the garden but now I cherish them and harvest armfuls of plants in July. I’ve googled images of feverfew but it just looks likes daisies to me – I wonder what the difference is? Plans will self-sow and flowers should be removed as needed to focus energy on leaf production. Clearly moths don’t suffer from headaches as they steer clear. Do you know how quickly it spreads? Is this something that will grow inside during the winter or does it need to have a dormant phase over the winter months? Thank you! If you sleep with vents or windows open you will get them creeping in at night so hang your repellents at windows too Tinctures are fairly easy to make. Feverfew is a type of chrysanthemum and spreads like wildfire in our garden and we have to weed some of it out, but it is a very pretty plant. Perennials can be odd about that, and each individual plant decides whether it likes a severe pruning or not. Here are a few great headache tea combinations, great list of other herbs that might help with joint pain, Rosemary Gladstar’s Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health, How to Prevent Weeds from Stealing Your Gardening Joy. Fiona..one of my customers has a really pretty double feverfew, similar flowers, just doubles..hoping to get some cuttings in winter. Add a ribbon and you have a perfect small present for someone or yourself. I recommend taking the cuttings in the morning when the plant is fresh and fully turgid. Test them first to see if they crumble easily into feverfew dust – any moisture left in the flowers will go mouldy if you harvest them too soon. Please post your result after seeing Diana. Just make sure not to take too many leaves from one plant since that can stress your Feverfew plant.